University of Idaho Extension, Nez Perce County U-Idaho Extension Image Map
 

Below are forms that you may download and fill out as best you can to accompany your sample. You can fill them out and save them on your computer, then print and bring them in with the sample. You can also attach photos of the sample to submit in an email to us at nezperce@uidaho.edu.

Sample Submission Forms
Just select, fill out, print and send:

Guidelines for Submitting Digital Plant Images for Identification or Diagnosis
You can help us by following these guidelines:

  • Download and fill out the diagnostic form as completely as possible and send or bring in to the office. The more information the diagnostician has, the more reliable the diagnosis will be. Or, include the information from the form in an email to us and attach your photos to the email message.
  • Please look at the photo images before sending them. If they look out of focus to you or if you can’t see the problem in your picture, they will not be helpful to us.
  • When possible, please include size reference such as a ruler or a coin.
  • Please include a whole plant image as well as close-ups of the plant parts. Try to include as many diagnostic features (flowers, leaves, bark, individual structures) as possible. Ideally, send images of the entire plant, the stem where it enters the soils, the roots, and a close view of the specimen, disorder or problem. Try to fill the frame of the image with the problem in question.
  • When taking digital images, use the flash on your camera in daylight photos to fill in detail and contrast. Also, use the macro function (plant picture button) that is on almost every digital camera when taking close shots so that they can be in focus. With the exception of some smart phones, images taken from cell phone cameras are often not of high enough quality and if the lens is scratched not clear enough for diagnosis.
  • Sometimes, subsequent examination of actual specimens is necessary to make an actual diagnosis. A digital image can give a suggestion of the cause of a problem, verify a possible diagnosis, or support the thinking that goes into making a diagnosis.

Below is a list of important plant features for identification:

  • Entire plant to give the diagnostician a general overview of the plant.
  • Leaf arrangement on the plant stem (alternate, opposite, whorled).
  • Leaf attachment to the plant stem (sessile or petiole).
  • Leaf blade shape (simple, compound, hear-shaped, etc.)  Multiple leaf shapes may be found on the same plant.
  • Leaf margin (dissected, toothed, or entire)
  • Root system (rhizomes, taproot, fibrous, etc.)
  • Inflorescence (solitary or cluster of heads)
  • Special characteristics of some species (leaves, sheathing stipules, spines or thorns, milky juice, etc.)
 November 19, 2013
 

The Lewis-Clark Valley has a growing season of over 200 days. Home gardeners and local commercial enterprises take advantage of the extended growing season in a variety of horticultural interests.

A wide range of gardening inquiries are answered each year concerning plant variety selection, culture, husbandry, and pest control by our Idaho Master Gardeners and horticulture staff. The UI Extension, Nez Perce County Horticultural Advisory Committee plays a pivotal role in identifying and prioritizing programming, classes, and seminars to meet the educational needs of the community.

potted plantsBanana Belt Gardening Series

The Banana Belt Gardening Series is tailored to present timely and useful information to meet the needs of gardeners of the Lewis-Clark Valley and surrounding area. The series is held every February on Wednesday evenings.

 

 

cherry blossom treePlant Clinic

One of the best places to get common-sense answers for your gardening questions is the Plant Clinic that operates during the growing season beginning the first week of May. Visit the Plant Clinic on Tuesdays from 9 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. at the UI Extension, Nez Perce County office (1239 Idaho Street in Lewiston, Idaho).

 

Idaho Master Gardener ProgramIdaho Master Gardener Program

The Idaho Master Gardener Program is an educational opportunity designed to meet the gardening information needs of the community. The purpose of the program is to extend technical assistance and provide home horticulture information to people within the community through the use of qualified volunteers.

Individuals who are interested in becoming Idaho Master Gardener volunteers must have the enthusiasm, commitment and time to volunteer; enjoy working with plants and people of all ages; a strong interest in horticulture or home gardening; and be willing to communicate and share knowledge effectively with others.

The next Idaho Master Gardener training in the LC Valley begins January 2014.

 

home landscape gardenNez Perce County Master Gardener Xeriscape Garden

A low water use demonstration garden is located next to the UI Extension, Nez Perce County office in Lewiston, Idaho. The garden’s purpose is to demonstrate traditional and alternative means of landscaping with low water use and drought tolerant plants. A plant list is available here, as well as at the UI Extension, Nez Perce County office.

 

Nez Perce County Plant or Insect Sample Submission Guidelines

Plant and insect samples may be brought in for identification or diagnosis to the UI Extension, Nez Perce County office. Accurate identification, diagnosis, or control measures depend on a great many factors; the more information you can provide about your sample will aid in answering your question.

 

 October 24, 2013
 

The challenge in diagnosing plant problems is getting enough critical information to understand what is going on. Identifying problems over the phone is generally unreliable. Someone will need a sample of the problem. Getting an adequate sample in to the Plant Clinic is most helpful.

If you have a plant or weed you would like  identified, a leaf or stem is often not ample material to do the job. If the plant is small, bring in the whole plant, roots and all. If it is large, bring in a branch. If possible, wait until it starts flowering, since many of the important identification characters are found there. Bring in several specimens. Some may be dissected in the Plant Clinic, some may be sent to an expert at the University of Idaho, and some may be kept as a reference specimen. The more you can bring in, the better.

The sample should be enclosed in a plastic bag and kept cool and out of direct sunlight. If you are not able to bring them in immediately, they will stay in good condition in a refrigerator.

The same goes with insects – bring in lots, if possible. If they are doing some plant damage, we need to know what plant they are feeding on, so bring in a sample of the plant, too. If you don’t know what kind of plant it is found on, then follow the above instructions for plant identification. As with plants, keep your insects out of direct sunlight and give them adequate ventilation. If they are beneficial insects, you will want to return them to your garden.

When diagnosing plant problems, the culprit is often very elusive and it requires a good detective who can understand what all the factors are that might be negatively affecting the plant. Things such a watering practices, pesticides and herbicides used in the area, construction activity or other changes in the area (like the removal of a nearby tree) can affect the health of a plant. When the Idaho Master Gardeners ask a lots of questions, they are doing their best to ensure that the problem is diagnosed properly. The last thing you want is to apply a treatment for the wrong problem.

Once the Idaho Master Gardeners have a handle on what the problem is, they can compile a variety of alternative treatments from the Plant Clinic reference library and pass this information back to you. With the correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment, you can show your unwanted guests to the door.

Sample Submission Forms:

 October 24, 2013
Oct 242013
 
Soil sampling plot diagramHow to take a soil sample
  1. Take at least six randomly spaced samples.
    Example sampling pattern:
  2. Sample to a depth of 8-12 inches.
  3. A clean shovel or soil probe may be used to acquire the samples. Tools should be stainless steel or aluminum alloy. No iron.
  4. Place samples in a clean plastic bucket. Never use a bucket that has been used to store or transport fertilizer materials.
  5. Mix the samples thoroughly and bring a composite sample of one pint (2 cups) soil to the UI Extension, Nez Perce County office. Include a soil sample submission form with the sample. In the “Submitter ID” field, name the sample what you are planning to plant, such as vegetable garden or flower bed.
    Soil sample submission form
  6. If the sample must be kept overnight before bringing it in, place the sample in the refrigerator.
    The standard test for pH, nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, and organic matter is $35 plus postage. Please make a check payable to Bursar, University of Idaho to enclose with the sample. We will help you package it for mailing and have you take it to the post office to mail.
  7. Plan on 5 to 15 days to receive the results back from the laboratory. After receiving the results, contact the UI Extension, Nez Perce County office for help interpreting results.

Additional Resources

 October 24, 2013
 

Idaho Master Gardener teachingThe Master Gardener program, conducted throughout the United States and Canada, is a two-part educational effort in which avid gardeners are provided many hours of intense home horticulture training. In return, they “pay back” local university extension agents through volunteerism.

Idaho Master Gardeners assist with garden lectures, exhibits, demonstrations, school and community gardening, diagnostic service, research and many other projects.

 

 

 

Plant Clinic
Special Topics
Volunteer Opportunities
  • Plant Clinic
  • Environmental Awareness Days
  • Lewiston Farmers Market
  • LC Valley Senior Health Fair
  • Nez Perce County Fair  |  Gardening Information Booth
Nez Perce County Idaho Master Gardener Forms
Online Resources
 October 24, 2013
 

Nez Perce County Idaho Master Gardeners: please put these events on your calendars. If you would like to participate in these events, please call or email us. It all applies to fulfilling your volunteer hours – and it will be fun, promise!



2014 Plant Clinic Dates

8 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Tuesdays through the growing season
UI Extension, Nez Perce County office (1239 Idaho Street, Lewiston)

  • May 6, 13, 20
  • June 3, 10, 17, 24
  • July 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
  • August 5, 12, 19, 26
  • September 9, 30
  • No Plant Clinic  May 27, September 2
Lewiston Farmers Market

5 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Saturdays | June through August
“D” Street Parking Lot, Downtown Lewiston

Idaho Master Gardeners can choose a theme for the table and display their posters. We have free publications and horticultural information that you can share with interested individuals.

Health and Wellness Fair

10 a.m. – Noon  |  1 or 2 hours shifts available
May 8, 2014
Lewiston Community Center

Nez Perce County and the City of Lewiston team up to offer a health and wellness fair for employees and their families at the Lewiston Community Center.

Environmental Awareness Days

9 a.m. – 2 p.m.  |  1 or 2 hour shifts available
Third Monday and Tuesday in May
Hells Gate State Park

A great chance to get to interact with 6th graders from throughout Nez Perce County. 
Help teach at the Urban Forestry booth.

Senior Health and Wellness Fair

9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
June 12, 2014
Lewiston Community Center

We share an informational booth with the Asotin County Master Gardeners. This would be a good place to display your poster and visit with our area retired population.

Nez Perce County Fair

September 18-21, 2014

Each year, UI Extension hosts a booth offering FREE gardening information and highlighting the diversity of agriculture throughout the county. Ideas are needed for booth themes and decoration. This is a great educational opportunity. Plan to share your poster information!

  • Wednesday – set up and decorate booth
  • Thursday is generally slow
  • Friday – lots of students and a youth focus
  • Saturday and Sunday – Idaho Master Gardeners and gardening information
 October 24, 2013
 

Plant and insect samples may be brought in for identification or diagnosis to the UI Extension, Nez Perce County office. Accurate identification, diagnosis, or control measures depend on many factors. The more information you can provide about your sample, the more it will aid in answering your question.

We have some forms available for you to fill out and accompany your sample with. You can print and bring the forms in with the sample, or email it as an attachment with pictures.

Sample Submission Forms:

Guidelines for Submitting Digital Plant Images for Identification or Diagnosis

You can help us by following these guidelines:

  • Download and fill out the diagnostic form as completely as possible. Mail, email, or bring it in person to the office. The more information the diagnostician has, the more reliable the diagnosis will be. When emailing forms, include the information from the form and attach your photos.
  • Please look at the photo images before sending them. If they look out of focus or if you can’t see the problem in your picture, they will not be helpful to us.
  • When possible, please include size references such as a ruler or a coin.
  • Please include a whole plant image as well as a close-up of the plant parts. Try to include as many diagnostic features (flowers, leaves, bark, individual structures) as possible. Ideally, send images of the entire plant, the stem where it enters the soils, the roots, and a close view of the specimen, disorder or problem. Try to fill the frame of the image with the problem in question.
  • When taking digital images, use the flash on your camera in daylight photos to fill in detail and contrast. Also, use the macro function (plant picture button) that is on almost every digital camera when taking close shots to ensure they are focused. With the exception of some smart phones, images taken from cell phone cameras are often not of high enough quality, and if the lens is scratched they will not be clear enough for diagnosis.
  • Sometimes, subsequent examination of actual specimens is necessary to make a diagnosis. A digital image can give a suggestion of the cause of a problem, verify a possible diagnosis, or support the thinking that goes into making a diagnosis.

Below is a list of important plant features for identification:

  • Entire plant to give the diagnostician a general overview of the plant
  • Leaf arrangement on the plant stem (alternate, opposite, whorled)
  • Leaf attachment to the plant stem (sessile or petiole)
  • Leaf blade shape (simple, compound, hear-shaped, etc.) Multiple leaf shapes may be found on the same plant
  • Leaf margin (dissected, toothed, or entire)
  • Root system (rhizomes, taproot, fibrous, etc.)
  • Inflorescence (solitary or cluster of heads)
  • Special characteristics of some species (leaves, sheathing stipules, spines or thorns, milky juice, etc.)
 October 24, 2013
 
 October 24, 2013